Beautiful Rule-Breaking Moth

kwowru:

thestoutorialist:

maliceandvice:

calantheandthenightingale:

mydollyaviana:

Disney vs. 7 early fairytales 

The 1812 version of Snow White is even worse when you consider that the girl was only seven years old in the tale (plus her unconscious body ended up being carted around by the prince until one of his servants accidentally woke her up).  Also, in The Little Mermaid, the mermaid’s unable to speak because she had her tongue cut out >__<

But I’d love to see faithful adaptations of the original tales.  Especially Bluebeard.  We need a Bluebeard adaptation.

Actually, the original-original pre-Grimm Brothers’ stories that were passed around Europe via oral tradition are nowhere near as violent as the Grimm’s made them. Cinderella’s stepsisters were never ugly and kept their eyes, Snow White’s mother was not even a villain (instead a group of bandits were), and instead of spending the whole story napping Sleeping Beauty outwitted a dangerous bandit leader, wouldn’t let him sleep with her, and saved herself. 

The original oral stories were radically changed by the Brothers Grimm to fit their personal and political beliefs. Most notably, they often added in female characters solely for the purpose of making them evil villains and took away most of the heroines’ agency and intelligence. Both brothers belonged to a small fanatical sect of Catholicism that vilified women because of the idea of Original Sin and Wilhelm in particular had a particularly deep hatred of women. The Grimms were actually pretty horrible people. Those cannibalistic queens and ugly stepsisters and the mass amount of violence against women didn’t exist until the Grimms wanted them to. Their ideas stuck so soundly though that we now assume they were in the original tales and that these terrible characters and ideas come out of some perceived barbaric Old World culture. But in truth they’re really the Grimms’ weird obsession with hating women showing through. The original oral folklore focused on the heroes’ and heroines’ good deeds and used them as ways to teach cultural norms and a society’s rules and encouraged girls to be quick-witted and street-savvy instead of passive princesses, and the Grimms promptly stripped that all away. 

"Grimms Bad Girls and Bold Boys" by Ruth Bottingheimer is an excellent book on this

I am so happy about this post, you have no idea.

officialcaesarsalazar:

A fairy tale where a child is cursed and the spell can only be broken with true love’s kiss.
Their mother then gently kisses them on the forehead and the spell is broken.
After all, love isn’t just romantic.

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

badass mermaid gangs who demand a stop to ocean pollution and warn ships about imminent storms

faeries of the forest jamming out to heavy metal in the dead of night and sighing because there are literally no band shirts in their size

wizards that travel with play groups and do the special effects 

friendly people reading ghosts’ favorite books aloud to them since they can’t always affect the living world when they want to

dragons that allow little children ride on their backs and roast marshmallows for them if they ask politely

immortal elves obsessed with medical science because human lives are already too short

angelchrys:

blindsprings:

secondlina:

Here is “Knot”, a short comic I drew to sell at Mocca and TCAF this year. The printed version is going to be SO PRETTY. I’m in love with the cover (which I will post later).

I just wanted to do something fairy-tale-like that talked about doubts and frustrations and how to deal with them. I’m really happy with how colorful and adorable the story turned out to be. 

If you enjoyed “Knot”, please consider reblogging it and/or checking out my ongoing webcomic Namesake! HUGS TO ALL OF YOU!

Isa’s been showing me wips of this for awhile, look how pretty this is finished, ahhh!!

Adorable!

mrockefeller:

Here are all 9 pieces from my first thesis project!

At the beginning of the semester, I read folktales from around the world and sought out interesting imagery and characters to develop into 9 full page illustrations. As I made each illustration, I did a ton of research into the clothing, symbols, patterns, and other related imagery from the each story’s culture.

I am fascinated by old stories and how they have been passed down and shaped future stories. I learned a lot from this project, but I feel like I’ve only scratched the surface! There is so much more to these unique cultures, and I’ll continue to draw inspiration from them.

For each individually, and some process sketches see the links below:

The Fisherman and the Gruagach of Tricks (Ireland)

The Giant Who Had no Heart In His Body (Norway)

The Firebird and the Horse of Power (Russia)

Sinbad and the Seven Voyages (Middle East)

The Magic Brocade (China)

Urashima (Japan)

Hats to Disappear With (Korea)

The Search for the Magic Lake ( Ecuador)

Oni and the Great Bird (West Africa, Yoruba Tribe)

All are available as prints on my inprnt!

Thank you everyone for your support over the past year! Here’s to a great 2014!

fairytalemood:

"Fairy Tales" by Lorena Alvarez

We, the queer women of the world, are good enough to be in fairy tales and adventure stories, stories where we get to ride dragons and hang out with warrior women and enter creepy castles and cursed temples clutching the ends of our scarves with nervous excitement. Stories where we exist.
Shira Glassman on Ladies Rescuing Ladies (via lesbianfairytales)
Everyone thinks of them in terms of poisoned apples and glass coffins, and forgets that they represent girls who walked into dark forests and remade them into their own reflections.
Indexing, Seanan McGuire (via mirroir)